TRUE STORIES

TRUE STORIES

Tuesday, 14 February 2017

Some beautiful answers and way of thinking of Turkish poet Jalaluddin Rumi

Some beautiful answers and way of thinking of Turkish poet Jalaluddin Rumi, that I cannot resist sharing..

What Is Poison ? ? ?
He Replied With A Beautiful Answer - AnyThing Which Is More Than Our Necessity Is Poison. It May Be Power, Wealth, Hunger, Ego, Greed, Laziness, Love, Ambition, Hate Or AnyThing.

What Is Fear ? ? ?
Non Acceptance Of Uncertainty.
If We Accept That Uncertainty, It Becomes Adventure.

What Is Envy ?
Non Acceptance Of Good In Others, If We Accept That Good, It Becomes Inspiration.

What Is Anger ? ? ?
Non Acceptance Of Things Which Are Beyond Our Control.
If We Accept, It Becomes Tolerance.

What Is Hatred ? ? ?
Non Acceptance Of Person As He Is. If We Accept Person Unconditionally, It Becomes Love. 😊 😊

Sunday, 5 February 2017

The wise teacher and the Jar

There was once a very wise teacher, whose words of wisdom students
would come from far and wide to hear. One day as usual, many students
began to gather in the teaching room. They came in and sat down very
quietly, looking to the front with keen anticipation, ready to hear
what the teacher had to say.

Eventually the teacher came in and sat down in front of the students.
The room was so quiet you could hear a pin drop. On one side of the
teacher was a large glass jar. On the other side was a pile of dark
grey rocks. Without saying a word, the teacher began to pick up the
rocks one by one and place them very carefully in the glass jar
(Plonk. Plonk.) When all the rocks were in the jar, the teacher turned
to the students and asked, 'Is the jar full?' 'Yes,' said the students.
'Yes, teacher, the jar is full'.

Without saying a word, the teacher began to drop small round pink
pebbles carefully into the large glass jar so that they fell down
between the rocks. (Clickety click. Clickety click.) When all the
pebbles were in the jar, the teacher turned to the students and asked,
'Is the jar now full?' The students looked at one another and then some
of them started nodding and saying, 'Yes. Yes, teacher, the jar is now
full. Yes'.

Without saying a word, the teacher took some fine silver sand and let
it trickle with a gentle sighing sound into the large glass jar (whoosh)
where it settled around the pink pebbles and the dark grey rocks.
When all the sand was in the jar, the teacher turned to the students
and asked, 'Is the jar now full?'

The students were not so confident this time, but the sand had clearly
filled all the space in the jar so a few still nodded and said, 'Yes,
teacher, the jar is now full. Now it's full'.

Without saving a word, the teacher took a jug of water and poured it
carefully, without splashing a drop, into the large glass jar. (Gloog.
Gloog.)

When the water reached the brim, the teacher turned to the students and
asked, 'Is the jar now full?' Most of the students were silent, but
two or three ventured to answer, 'Yes, teacher, the jar is now full.
Now it is'.

Without saying a word, the teacher took a handful of salt and sprinkled
it slowly over the top of the water with a very quiet whishing sound.
(Whish.) When all the salt had dissolved into the water, the teacher
turned to the students and asked once more, 'Is the jar now full?' The
students were totally silent. Eventually one brave student said, 'Yes,
teacher. The jar is now full'. 'Yes,' said the teacher 'The jar is now
full'.

The teacher then said: 'A story always has many meanings and you will
each have understood many things from this demonstration. Discuss
quietly amongst yourselves what meanings the story has for you. How
many different messages can you find in it and take from it?'

The students looked at the wise teacher and at the beautiful glass jar
filled with grey rocks, pink pebbles, silver sand, water and salt. Then
they quietly discussed with one another the meanings the story had for
them. After a few minutes, the wise teacher raised one hand and the
room fell silent. The teacher said: 'Remember that there is never just
one interpretation of anything. You have all taken away many meanings
and messages from the story, and each meaning is as important and as
valid as any other'.

And without saying another word, the teacher got up and left the room.

And another version of the same story ...

A professor stood before his philosophy class and
had some items in front of him. When the class began,
wordlessly, he picked up a very large and empty jar and proceeded to fill it with golf
balls. He then asked the students if the jar was full.
They agreed that it was.
So the professor then picked up a box of small
pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar
lightly. The pebbles rolled into the open areas
between the golf balls. He then asked the students
again if the jar was full.
They agreed it was.

The professor next picked up a box of sand and poured
it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up
everything else. He asked once more if the jar was
full.
The students responded with a unanimous "Yes."
The professor then produced two cans of beer from
under the table and poured the entire contents into
the jar, effectively filling the empty space between
the sand.
The students laughed.

"Now", said the professor, as the laughter subsided, "I
want you to recognize that this jar represents your
life. The golf balls are the important things - your
family, your children, your health, your friends, your
favorite passions - things that, if everything else was
lost and only they remained, your life would still be
full. The pebbles are the other things that matter
like your job, your house, your car.

The sand is
everything else - the small stuff. If you put the sand
into the jar first" he continued, "there is no room
for the pebbles or the golf balls.
The same goes for life. If you spend all your time and
energy on the small stuff, you will never have room
for the things that are important to you. Pay
attention to the things that are critical to your
happiness. Play with your children. Take time to get
medical checkups. Take your partner out to dinner.
There will always be time to clean the house, and fix
the rubbish. Take care of the golf balls first, the
things that really matter. Set your priorities.
The rest is just sand".

One of the students raised her hand and inquired what
the beer represented.
The professor smiled. "I'm glad you asked. It just
goes to show you that, no matter how full your life may
seem, there's always room for a couple of beers".